More Ideas for PowerPoint

For years I have taught summer technology courses to teachers, instructional assistants, and therapists of every kind.  One of the most popular courses was “PowerPoint for Special Educators.”  In a previous post, I described how I use PowerPoint as a drawing tablet to create printable scenes that teach language in context.  That post also describes how to use PPT to create full- and half-page books and social stories.  Both uses of PPT involve the straightforward and simple use of the text tool and drawing tools.  You can illustrate with graphics (photos, clipart, symbols) from any source:  your camera/phone, the library built into PPT, Google Images, and sources of communication symbols, such as Boardmaker and SymbolStix.  When importing graphics from outside PPT, I always advise that you use a blank (white) background, as some illustrations will import with a white border that is visible on a colored background.

Other printable materials that you can create with PowerPoint are:

  • flashcards
  • gameboards
  • coloring pages
  • matching activities
  • posters
  • newsletters
  • behavior charts
  • in other words, just about any kind of printable visual supports you can think of!

But it is easy to use PPT to create on-screen activities for your students, as well.   This post is not intended as a step-by-step guide for how to use all of the tools in PPT;  that would be far too extensive and complex for me to type and you to read through.  I do hope you glean enough information from this overview to start some exploring on your own. (If you feel you’d benefit from in-depth training, contact me about the possibility of a full-day workshop at your school or ask your IT department for some guidance).   I’ll give some examples to get you started and, if there’s enough interest in the topic, I’ll add more in future posts.

PPT is a great tool for reviewing curricular materials and taking practice quizzes. These can be done in all text or a combination of text and symbols, and can be silent or with sound. You record the text to be read to the student, import sound effects that match or enhance the visual, or use built-in sound effects to indicate correct/incorrect answers, page turn, etc.  These PPT-based learning materials can be as simple or sophisticated to meet the student’s developmental level, from cause/effect through multiple choice practice quizzes, and can be especially helpful for students with special needs.  (Note: PPT will not keep score, which is why I use them for practice.  If you want to keep track of the student’s performance, ie use this as a real test, you’d have to have an adult sit with the student to tally correct/incorrect responses).

As I said, this is not a detailed instructional manual, but let’s take a look at how Action Buttons can be used to create a simple illustrated quiz.

Screen Shot 2019-07-29 at 4.31.06 PMFirst, I use the Clip Art Gallery to find the pictures that I want. (Note your other choices for importing graphics as well).

 

Screen Shot 2019-07-29 at 4.30.18 PMThen I place the pictures on the page and add the text prompt.

 

 

 

Screen Shot 2019-07-29 at 4.38.34 PM From the Slide Show menu, scroll down to Action Buttons and over to Next Slide.

 

 

 

 

Screen Shot 2019-07-29 at 4.44.03 PMWhen you draw an Action Button over the correct answer, it will appear as a big blue arrow.  We will fix that in a moment.  You will also get this pop-up menu.  It is already programmed to go to the next page.  You can chose to select a sound effect, such as applause (built into PPT) or an actual cow mooing (imported from a free sound effects site).

 

Screen Shot 2019-07-29 at 4.52.59 PMDouble-click on the blue arrow to bring up the Format toolbar.  Slide Transparency all the way to the right to get rid of the blue background on the button. Then pull down on the Line menu to select “no line.”  When you click off the button, it will have become invisible.

Create additional cards in the same way, ending with a blank card or card that you decorate in some way, title “The End,” or whatever you want (the Action Button always has to have a place to go).  Each time, put an invisible Action Button over the correct answer.

NOW THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT!!  You can choose to have a fancy transition or just simply show the next slide.  Transitions and sound effects can be fun and reinforcing or highly distracting, so know your student and plan accordingly.  IF YOU ARE USING ACTION BUTTONS AS DESCRIBED ABOVE, you need to change a setting in the Transitions Toolbar!

Screen Shot 2019-07-29 at 4.58.51 PM

After you have created your entire activity, go to the Transitions Toolbar and DESELECT “Advance Slide On Mouse Click.”  If you leave that checked, the student can click anywhere on the screen and the slide will advance.  If you uncheck that box, the only way the student can move to the next slide is by clicking on the correct answer.

Whew.  That’s the very basics of creating an onscreen practice quiz.  It may seem complicated, but once you do it a few times, it is really quite simple.  There is SOOOO much more you can do with PPT for your students.  I hope this will get you started exploring this powerful tool.

One final note:  my screenshots may look different from what you see on your screen, depending on the Mac or Windows version you are using.  Don’t worry about these differences!  The tools are all there somewhere and they all work the same.

 

The Surprising Power of PowerPoint

Screen Shot 2019-07-18 at 9.01.37 AMI’ve been giving workshops for over 20 years in how to use applications on your computer in ways they were never intended — all to benefit your students and to ease the burden of caseload management.  One of my favorite workshops is “PowerPoint for Special Educators.”  If you only use PPT for slideshow presentations or don’t use it at all, you are missing out on a versatile tool in your toolbox!  This post won’t be a detailed instruction manual for each use of PPT with your caseload (although I’d be happy to come to your school to do a workshop sometime!).  Instead, this overview should help those who are familiar with PPT to explore some of these uses on their own.  And if you have come up with a use that I haven’t described in this post, please share in the comments!  PPT is available for Windows and Mac, and one beauty of this program is that you can move seamlessly from one platform to another:  make it on Mac, show it on Windows, no problem.  Here are some of the ways I use PPT to make printed materials for my caseload and some tips to boost your creativity and efficiency:

  1.  Use PPT as a drawing pad.  Years ago, I had access to a wonderful application called AppleWorks.  Oh, how I loved this package of word processing and drawing!  The drawing tools were fantastic, as they allowed me to do all kinds of scenes and other graphics to help my students with language and concept development.  Then Apple — for reasons I will never understand — dropped AppleWorks, and we were stuck with Microsoft Office for Mac.  The word processing part of Office is fine, but I couldn’t find any workable way to do my scenes and other graphics….until I found the drawing tools in PowerPoint.  YAY!!!  That brings us to Tip #1:  you don’t have to use PPT exclusively for slideshows.  I will often use PPT for all kinds of illustrations to support my students’ needs:
    1. freehand drawing simple or complex scenes with the tools provided in PPT
    2. use the freehand tools and text labels combined with photos or other graphics from other sources — a great way to develop lessons that relate to the student’s curriculum for students who need simplified presentation and visual supports
    3. create multiple-choice quizzes with graphics, such as the 10-question quiz I present after reading a book to my developmental kindergarten and Life Skills classes
    4. create adapted worksheets and homework pages with text and graphics
    5. create board games for artic and language therapy
  2. Use PPT to create social stories and easy-reading books.  I love, love, love to use PPT to create printed books and social stories because it is so quick and easy!  Create your title page, then combine text and illustrations on each page of your story, just the way you would if you were making a slideshow presentation.  Tip #2 (and this applies to uses described above as well):  It is best to use a blank (white) background if you are bringing in graphics from other sources, as these sometimes come with a white background border that you can’t see until you paste it on a colored slide. Yes, there are ways to get around this but I’m all about working efficiently.  Why take another step or two if you can avoid it?  When your book is finished, it’s time to print!  Decide if you want each page of the story to be a full sheet of paper, or if you want your book to be half-size.  This decision will determine how you tell the slides to print.  If you want a half-size book, select 2 slides per page.  Tip #3:  I always deselect the optional border on these slides because it makes a much better appearance.  Tip #4:  use a personal paper trimmer or paper cutter to cut the pages in half in no time.

I will provide more ideas and tips in a future post, so stay tuned!

What does that mean??

Some years back, my son moved to Brazil to marry a lovely Brazil college professor.  During his time there, my son became fluent in Portuguese, and this became my grandson’s first language.  When little Miguel was 2 years old, my son started exposing him to English in preparation for their planned move to the US a year later.  When Miguel arrived here at age 3, he had some conversational English, but Portuguese was still his go-to language.  One of the first things I taught him was to ask, “what does that mean?” when encountering unfamiliar vocabulary.  Now he is nearly 6 years old and his language skills are off the charts, mainly because parents and grandparents speak to him in an adult-like manner and read to him constantly (his favorite activity).  He has a deep love for words and is always happy to learn new ones.  Here’s an example of a recent conversation as we walked home from the bus stop;  mind you, he does know what some of the words mean but enjoys playing this as a game.

  • Me: Miguel, I have a proposal for you.
  • Miguel:  What’s proposal mean?
  • Me: It means a suggestion.
  • Miguel: What’s a suggestion?
  • Me:  It’s an idea I want you to consider.
  • Miguel:  What’s consider mean?
  • Me:  It means to think about something to see if it is a good idea or not.
  • Miguel:  Oh, so you have an idea you want me to think about, like “I propose that we go to the Crayola Factory!”

Bingo!  By encouraging Miguel to ask for definitions, by using vocabulary and reading books that are above his age level, and by making word-play (puns, riddles, knock-knock jokes) fun games that we play, he has become a very competent speaker of English and has learned a very useful strategy for life-long learning:  if you don’t understand something, ASK!

product_wad_Storyteller_s-Word-a-Day-three-assembled-illustration-and-facts_900xI recently purchased a stand-up book for Miguel from MrsWordsmith.com called “Storyteller’s Word a Day.”  The book is kept on an end table in the living room and is the first thing Miguel goes to when he comes over.  A recent word was “incessant.”  After we reviewed the meaning, he told me that they had a fire drill that week and the alarm was incessant.  Then he flipped back a few pages to another word and said, “It was this, too — grating!  The noise was incessant and grating!”   Pretty good carryover for a kindergartener, don’t you think?

This book would be ideal for SLPs to use in school, as there are words for every day from September to May.  Each page has a cartoon drawing depicting the meaning, the word, the definition and part of speech, and an easy to understand example.  (That’s as far as I go with Miguel right now).  For those who are really into words, the back of the page provides etymology, word pairs, synonyms, frequency of use, and a story starter.  Wow!  Just think of how many IEP goals you can hit with this!  “Storyteller’s Word a Day” is designed for ages 6-13, making it ideal for your middle-grade language students. Also available through this website are a similar book for 3-6-year-olds and an illustrated dictionary.  All use colorful, humorous cartoons to bring the words to life.

While this book is new to me, the strategy of teaching students to ask goes way back in my career when I developed a game I call “Hit or Miss” for my language students.  I realized that reading comprehension issues are often related to vocabulary deficits AND the student’s tendency to read the word fluently but never stopping to figure out the meaning.  I liken this to the students as Swiss Cheese reading:  they are solid on a lot of the words but they do have some holes that can greatly affect their comprehension.  The “Hit or Miss” game goes like this:  As a student reads aloud from his textbook or grade-level library book, he is to stop and ask the definitions of any unfamiliar words and earns a point (a “hit”) each time he does that.  If he doesn’t stop at a word that I suspect might be unfamiliar, I will stop him and ask for the meaning.  If he does know the word, he gets another point.  If he doesn’t know the word, that’s a “miss” and I get the point.  After the first session or two, the student nearly always wins because he has learned to ask for help when he needs it.  I’ve shared this strategy with their classroom teachers, who have then used it in small group reading instruction — ideal carryover support!

 

The Many Uses of Wordless Picture Books

There is no moment more magical than the first time a child reads — actually reads — a book independently.  Such focus, such concentration on the text as the child decodes the printed words!  This is the first step on a lifelong journey across time, space, cultures, and ideas that a love of reading will provide.

29313But firing the imagination is not limited to books with text.  Indeed, wordless picture books may tap into more imagination, more language, more critical thinking, and more projecting of one’s self into the story.  Whether illustrations are simple or lush, the reader uses them to answer so many questions, because that is the only way the story can be told:  Who or what is in the picture?  Where and when is this taking place?  What is happening?  Why is this happening?  What is the problem?  What are some solutions?  How did the character’s actions work out?  What is the difference between this picture and the one before and the one after?  Did anything change?  How does the character feel? What is the character thinking?  How would you feel?  What would you do?  What will happen next?  And on and on….

Wordless picture books are ideal for speech/language therapy.  Just think of how many 17165875goals can be addressed by a single wordless book by letting the child take the lead in “reading” the story:  describing, labeling, grammar, predicting, articulation, and fluency are just a few of the typical s/l skills that can be practiced and measured.  Add to that joint attention, answering questions, turn-taking, and perspective-taking, and you’ll see that wordless picture books are ideal for working on pragmatic skills.  When the child has finished “reading” the book, review it for practice in recall, retelling, and sequencing.  Have a student who is weak in written language?  Use wordless picture books to practice sentence and story writing. Working with very young children or children with cognitive impairments?  Use the books to build receptive skills and basic concepts:  Show me —.  Point to —-.  Where is —?  What color/shape is —?   He is clapping;  now you clap.    Imagine — all of these communication skills can be  worked on, no reading required!

the-lion-and-the-mouseWordless picture books are especially good for children who use AAC.  In addition to building all of the skills detailed above, the children can use their AAC system at the single word, phrase, or full sentence levels to tell the story, answer your questions, and ask questions of their own.  This builds fluency with the system as they learn how to navigate to needed core and fringe vocabulary, and helps AAC users increase their mean length of utterance.

22750286If you Google “wordless picture books,” you’ll find a lot of “top ten” recommendations.  If you want to find titles of a hundreds wordless picture books, join Goodreads.com (free), then put in this URL:  https://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/wordless-picture-books.  I guarantee you’ll find a year’s worth of books that will appeal to and be appropriate for all of the students on your caseload, regardless of age, gender, personal interests, or IEP goals.  Many may be available in your school or public library.  To add to your own collection, you can search local booksellers or find nearly all on Amazon.

“What goes on in that Speech Room?”

Kids are curious about that little room down the hall, next to the nurse’s office.  What is that room for?  Who goes there?  It looks like a fun place!  Why can’t I go, too?  Kids who WILL be going to speech/language therapy have different questions.  Why am I going to Speech?  What is therapy like?

To help SLPs and teachers explain speech/language therapy to newly identified students AND the rest of the class, I’ve written three children’s books that address three different aspects of what we do.

Matthew cover“The Mouth With a Mind of Its Own” is about a little boy with such significant articulation issues that he can’t even say his own name.  He is isolated from his classmates, who think he is speaking a foreign language, and he misses out on daily activities because he can’t make himself understood.  Fortunately, the speech/language pathologist comes to the rescue and leads him through the process from screening to articulate speech. At the end of the book, I’ve answered questions submitted by students from my own elementary school in a section called “Get to Know a Speech/Language Pathologist.”

Screen Shot 2014-06-24 at 12.06.24 PM“There Was a Speech Teacher Who Swallowed Some Dice” is a silly rhyming tale to introduce students to all of the items commonly used in therapy. Kids love this “speechie” twist on a familiar tale.  The book ends with a glossary of all of the therapy items and how we use them, and has a “Speech Room Scavenger Hunt” that you can photocopy for the students as they hunt for all of  the items in your room — a language lesson in itself!

 

Katie cover“How Katie Got a Voice (and a cool new nickname)”  acquaints students with assistive technology, including augmentative communication, and how it changes the way classmates view a fourth grade girl who has significant physical and communication disabilities.  This book ends with a section on disability etiquette.   Katie is also available in a German translation from Amazon in Germany.

 

 

Each book can be a stand-alone lesson, but you don’t have to stop there!  Here are additional resources that will extend each book into lessons in articulation, vocabulary, language, story mapping, and more. Click on the colored text below to get to the resources, the majority of which are FREE!

“How Katie Got a Voice (and a cool new nickname)”:  I’ve created a Reader’s Theater version of the book and PowerPoint “scenery” you can project, a free Discussion Guide which can also be used as writing prompts, and a Communication Word Search.  A Disability Etiquette video, “Making Everyone Feel Welcome,” told by the characters of the book, is on my YouTube channel. While on YouTube, check out the amazing video made by Polish students who have disabilities, inspired by Katie’s story, ideal for middle and high school students.  Clever SLP, Truvine Walker, offers a number of free artic and language activities related to this book at her TeachersPayTeachers store.

“The Mouth With a Mind of Its Own”:  Truvine Walker offers a free Speech/Language Companion Packet for this book on TPT that extends the story in many directions to meet a variety of s/l therapy goals.

“There Was a Speech Teacher Who Swallowed Some Dice”:   Truvine Walker created an amazing Speech/Language Companion Packet for this wacky story — again, it’s free!

These books are super gifts for student clinicians and SLPs in the school.  Autographed and personalized copies are available through Speaking of Speech.com.  Did you order your copy from Amazon but wish it was autographed?  Send me an email at pat@speakingofspeech.com, and I’ll send you a free signed bookplate!